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Oct 1

bublog:

It’s only the first day of October and BUB’s already trying on costumes. 

bublog:

It’s only the first day of October and BUB’s already trying on costumes. 


ucresearch:

Why are human faces so unique?
What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.
Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.
In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”
As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.
“Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”
Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique →

ucresearch:

Why are human faces so unique?


What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.

Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.

In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”

As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.

“Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”

Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique

(via fastcompany)


Sep 30
tastefullyoffensive:

The Wisconsin Humane Society is really good at naming kittens. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

The Wisconsin Humane Society is really good at naming kittens. [via]


popchartlab:

A roundup of NYC’s rooftop darlings, this visual compendium arrays a curated selection of the city skyline’s unsung signatures: its wondrous water towers.
20% off for 24 hours only! 

popchartlab:

A roundup of NYC’s rooftop darlings, this visual compendium arrays a curated selection of the city skyline’s unsung signatures: its wondrous water towers.

20% off for 24 hours only! 

(via ilovecharts)


bublog:

First she was an author, then a talk show host, and then a movie star. And today BUB is the CEO of the ASPCA.

bublog:

First she was an author, then a talk show host, and then a movie star. And today BUB is the CEO of the ASPCA.


styleathome:

DIY Project: Captain’ mirror {PHOTO: Michael Nangreaves}Find the full instructions here: http://www.styleathome.com/how-to/diy-decor/diy-project-captain-s-mirror/a/55545

styleathome:

DIY Project: Captain’ mirror {PHOTO: Michael Nangreaves}

Find the full instructions here: http://www.styleathome.com/how-to/diy-decor/diy-project-captain-s-mirror/a/55545

(via apartmenttherapy)



fastcodesign:

As technical director of 1 World Trade Center, SOM’s Nicole Dosso is the most famous architect you’ve never heard of.

Read More>

fastcodesign:

As technical director of 1 World Trade Center, SOM’s Nicole Dosso is the most famous architect you’ve never heard of.

image

Read More>





archiemcphee:

Bangkok-based photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously featured here) continues to take breathtaking photos of Siamese fighting fish, also known as betta fish. His fascination with their splendid, flowing fins and brilliant coloring is apparent in the extraordinarily detailed portraits he creates. The photos are so perfectly clear and close-up that it’s easy to forget the fish are underwater and not floating in midair.

Angkatavanich recently told Popular Photography that he only started photographing the fish after encountering them for the first time three years ago at a fish show and has since become obsessed with the different species which vary greatly in size, shape, and color patterns.

Head over to Visarute Angkatavanich’s 500px gallery to view more of his gorgeous betta portraits. Limited edition prints of his photos are currently available through La Lanta Fine Art.

[via Colossal]


Sep 28

georgetakei:

That was zen. This is meow.

georgetakei:

That was zen. This is meow.


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